5 Tips in 5 Parts – Transforming Leadership Disagreements into Leadership Alignment – Part 4

~ what to do when your leadership team clashes more than it agrees ~ 

This 5-part February series is about aligned leadership. If you are the leader of an organization, the manager of a team, or part of a team that can spend too much time struggling to find agreement, I’m confident you will find at least two take-aways for helping your team stay aligned and attain their highest-level success. This is Part 4 of the series.

Are continuous leadership disagreements stalling your company’s success? When “varied perspectives” become continually disagreeing perspectives, the success of your organization or company can suffer the consequences. Delayed decisions, meetings that take too much time, and discussions that focus more on problems than solutions, are sometimes only the top layer of what’s not working.

There are numerous possible recurrent issues, such as a major conflict regarding the organization itself to an increase in a team member’s personal stress-level. When team conflicts consistently arise, your ability to get a clear sense of the cause or problem is a first step in addressing it.

Part 4

Non-productive leadership patterns 

We all have productive ways that support our business success. We also have less-productive ways that can dampen our perspective, communication, and energy. These leadership patterns (beliefs, habits, reactions) don’t typically begin when someone is promoted or reaches a certain level in an organization, they sometimes go back to early life or work. Less-productive patterns can get in the way of our communication, enthusiasm, planning and other strategic aspects of our work, and so diminish our ability to collaborate and effectively contribute to a team.

Moving forward  An important clue that a “problem” pattern (or patterns) may be sidelining your team’s success is recognizing that your or a team member’s reaction (or over-reaction) has shown up before and has been showing up for a while. As this is a larger topic and a common challenge, please stay tuned for solutions and further discussion in a blog post following this series.

This is part 4 of a 5-part series. Click here Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 to read from the beginning. If you don’t already follow my blog, sign up now (in the right-hand column) to receive email notifications of future posts. I appreciate your readership and welcome your thoughts and comments!

5 Tips in 5 Parts – Transforming Leadership Disagreements into Leadership Alignment – Part 3

~ what to do when your leadership team clashes more than it agrees ~ 

This 5-part February series is about aligned leadership. If you are the leader of an organization, the manager of a team, or part of a team that can spend too much time struggling to find agreement, I’m confident you will find at least two take-aways for helping your team stay aligned and attain their highest-level success. This is Part 3 of the series.

Are continuous leadership disagreements stalling your company’s success? When “varied perspectives” become continually disagreeing perspectives, the success of your organization or company can suffer the consequences. Delayed decisions, meetings that take too much time, and discussions that focus more on problems than solutions, are sometimes only the top layer of what’s not working.

There are numerous possible recurrent issues, such as a major conflict regarding the organization itself to an increase in a team member’s personal stress-level. When team conflicts consistently arise, your ability to get a clear sense of the cause or problem is a first step in addressing it.

Part 3

A difficult personality  You value a variety of opinions – but you may have an oppositional member on your team – someone seeming to always take the reverse position from the rest of the team. Some amount of opposition can bring a healthy level of “devil’s advocate” perspective, offsetting any “group think” that may occur.  However, sometimes this more contrarian-type individual may shut down their listening and resist even the best ideas, causing a stall in forward progress.

Moving forward  As leader, beginning all meetings with a clearly-stated meeting context and defined agenda aligns attendees at the start. Also, upholding clear ground rules and decision-making protocols can rein in discussions that may be high-jacked by a dissenting team member. If these strategies are not enough, meet one-on-one with this team member to acknowledge the value they bring to the organization, and request that they do their part to manage the flow and progress of meetings. This may encourage the individual’s self-awareness in a more helpful way.

Still no progress? You may decide this challenge is outside of the scope of your role or what you would like to spend your time addressing. In this case, when you are certain of the value this individual brings to the team, consider the support of an outside coach to discuss a possible 360° assessment or Results System™ coaching to expand the team member’s self-awareness and address the challenge in a sustainable way. As well, if you’re not clear about this individual’s fit for your organization’s leadership, an executive coach can support you in gaining the clarity you need.

This is part 3 of a 5-part series. Click here Part 1, Part 2 to read from the beginning. If you don’t already follow my blog, sign up now (in the right-hand column) to receive email notifications of future posts. I appreciate your readership and welcome your thoughts and comments!

7 Leadership Challenges that Executive Coaches Address Head-on:

Leadership is about influence, and positive, productive communication.  Leaders are called to think in a forward direction, recognizing possibilities for innovation and new levels of purposeful progress.  They are team builders.  They are propellers of energy, engagement, and solutions.  

And leaders are human.  Their behaviors can go out of alignment and get in the way of creativity, connection, and accomplishment.  

Executive coaches support leaders in stepping forward to their vision, and managing the course of direction for their organization or company.

 7 Key leadership challenges that executive coaches support clients in addressing are:  

  1. Leaning away from stale or less than effective strategies to Embrace innovation.
  2. Spending less time in frustration to Manage engagement and energy to stay in flow.
  3. Depending less on tactical communications to Expand their communication style to build more positive and potential-filled relationships. 
  4. Reacting less from old habitual patterns to Respond more from authenticity and other strengths. 
  5. Asking fewer questions from the intention to give advice to Strengthen their capacity to hear what is being said. 
  6. Spending less time “on the fence” of indecision to Build a leadership framework to support solid decision-making.  
  7. Presenting less from pattern extremes to Step further into the power of authentic Leadership Presence.

 

Trish Pratt,  Executive and Career Development Coach — Greater Boston area

The Power of DISC and Your Career Success: Part 4 of a 5-part series

Career Coach DISC C Executive

Moving on to the fourth dimension of the DiSC, let’s look at the “C”.

Conscientiousness, Quality, Details and Standards – these are hallmark strengths of a high “C” dimension. Where the “I” and “S” dimensions include the ability to sense or “see” the big picture of a situation. “C” qualities are about discerning and details.

Having a co-worker or staff member with a strong “C” dimension, means working with someone who will notice the standards and mind the details. If you’re an individual with high “C” traits, you look to manage your work and career from lower risk strategies and prefer environments that reflect high-quality results.  As with the first three dimensions we discussed, the “C” dimension also has its strengths and challenges.

Some Coaching challenges for the high “C” dimension are:

  • Need for higher standards – frustration with management’s or team’s lack of work/project standards and quality, and/or lack of planning.
  • Unstable environment – frustration with organization’s changing goals, lack of focus or plan.
  • Lack of time – to accomplish quality work; feeling pressured to accomplish too much in too short of time.
  • Communication difficulties – regarding above, or complaints from others who feel criticized or micro-managed.
  • Frustrating feedback — Complaints from management or team regarding productivity and/or slow decision-making.
  • Work/Life balance challenges – too much work, too little support, struggles with delegating.

If you relate to any of these challenges, notice how your “C” strengths support your work, and yet also go out of balance from time to time. The “C” dimension brings a set of great leadership qualities that are often seen in financial executives, accountants, engineers, attorneys, and others. Consider a DiSC assessment to help you leverage your “C” and expand your career leadership potential!

If your organization is ready to streamline their team effectiveness, contact Trish for more information on how a team DiSC Workshop can expand communication and elevate your team success!

The Power of DISC and Career Success: Part 2 of a 5-part series

As mentioned in Part I of this series, the DiSC is a powerful executive and career development tool often used in coaching. Using four simple letters, D,I,S and C (or a combination of them) this assessment provides clients with a view of their strengths as well as strategies for leveraging these strengths.  This post looks at the “I” dimension.

Interpersonal, Influence, Inspirational and Optimistic  These “I” qualities are about gaining energy through connecting with people.  Those with a high “I” dimension are trusting and their strengths lie in their ability to communicate with and relate to others.  This dimension is often found in Sales, Customer Service, Management and Training industries. Those with a high “I” dimension are typically more outwardly focused and can sense the mood of a group or room full of people in a short amount of time.

On the flip side of these strengths, some common work challenges that show up in coaching those with this dimension are:

  • Isolation at work – not enough teamwork, too little connection to co-workers; too little appreciation from your staff or boss.
  • Difficulty organizing — too much paperwork, too many details; too many distractions and lack of follow-through.
  • Lack of positive work environment — frustrations with negative co-workers or environment; too little freedom or independence in your work.
  • Communication challenges – complaints from others that you talk too much or lack sincerity; also lack of directness in difficult conversations.
  • Lack of motivation due to criticism of work or work style – Not feeling accepted or appreciated by clients, co-workers, managers, etc.

If you relate to any of these challenges, you may notice how your “I” strengths support your work, and yet may also go out of balance from time to time. Consider how you might temper your strengths without stepping too far away from them. The “I” dimension brings a set of great leadership qualities that are often seen in sales executives, ceo’s, managers, entrepreneurs and others. Consider a DiSC assessment to help you bring out the most effective “I” in you!

If you like to know more about your DiSC Behavioral Style and how you can leverage your style to streamline your career or leadership success, contact Trish and mention this post for a 20% discount on a DiSC assessment.

 

Trish Pratt, Executive and Career Development Coach — Greater Boston area

High "D" Runner Coaching Client

The Power of DiSC and Career Success

Part 1 of a 5-part blog series.

Assessments can be helpful executive and career development tools, especially when combined with coaching. One powerful, easy to understand coaching assessment describes behavioral style and is called the DiSC. Though humans are complex creatures who can’t be summed up in a few simple letters or descriptive words, the DiSC can add high-level clarity to a client’s self-understanding and leadership strengths. Simply said, when looking to better understand yourself, your team, and your career, the DiSC is a powerful tool!

There are four DiSC Dimensions. Let’s look at the “D”.

Direct, Dominant, gets things Done — these are hallmark strengths for individuals with a high “D” dimension of behavior. “D-ness” is about using the most direct path to accomplish results, and speaking directly to the point – short and succinct. The “D” dimension is also about stepping into power and authority, and being energized by a perfect challenge.

On the flip side of these strengths, some common work challenges for individuals with a high “D” dimension are:

  • Impatience with slow progress — from your methodical team, staff member or boss; from project difficulties, or a micromanaging boss.
  • Frustration with easily offended co-workers – people you work with who may ask a lot of questions, need too much hand-holding, move too slowly, or are too indirect.
  • Irritation due to lack of acknowledgement – as in lack of job promotion, too little responsibility, or not enough freedom.
  • Boredom — from lack of challenge or clear work goals, to lack of career progress or clear direction.
  • Communication challenges — Others complaining that you don’t listen, that you yell or push too hard; that you expect too much.

If you relate to any of these challenges, you may notice how your “D” strengths support your work, and yet may go out of balance from time to time. If so, you may want to learn ways to temper your strengths while still leading from them.  After all, you are a person that gets things done!  The “D” dimension brings a set of great leadership qualities that are often seen in executives, managers, project leaders, entrepreneurs and others. Bring out the most effective “D” in you!

If you’d like to know more about your DiSC Behavioral Style and how to leverage it to streamline your career success… contact Trish and mention this post for a 20% discount on a DISC assessment.

Trish Pratt, Executive and Career Development Coach — Greater Boston area

Bold Leadership

Career Coaching for Career Boldness

There is no passion to be found playing small – in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living. — Nelson Mandela

As you step further into your career, further along a career path you are building, you may realize you want something more.  You want to be excited by your work and energized by bold possibilities!

Nelson Mandela says so much in this great quote.  Heed his encouragement and take the career path that brings more of you to your life.

Make 2017 your best career year yet!

Trish Pratt, Executive and Career Development Coach — Greater Boston area.