5 Tips in 5 Parts – Transforming Leadership Disagreements into Leadership Alignment – Part 2

~ what to do when your leadership team clashes more than it agrees ~ 

This 5-part February series is about aligned leadership. If you are the leader of an organization, the manager of a team, or part of a team that can spend too much time struggling to find agreement, I’m confident you will find at least two take-aways for helping your team stay aligned and attain their highest-level success. This is Part 2 of the series.

Are continuous leadership disagreements stalling your company’s success? When “varied perspectives” become continually disagreeing perspectives, the success of your organization or company can suffer the consequences. Delayed decisions, meetings that take too much time, and discussions that focus more on problems than solutions, are sometimes only the top layer of what’s not working.

There are numerous possible recurrent issues, such as a major conflict regarding the organization itself to an increase in a team member’s personal stress-level. When team conflicts consistently arise, your ability to get a clear sense of the cause or problem is a first step in addressing it.

Part 2

A clashing of behavioral styles  A strong difference in behavioral styles can also create tension in a team.  Such as when one or more individuals with a D (Dominant) style looks to move directly and bottom-line the discussion, while perhaps a high C (Conscientious) team member is looking to proceed slowly to uphold a high-level of standards.  Or when a “big-picture” focus of an individual with a high I (Influence) or S (Steadiness) style struggles to influence a person with a more detailed focus.  In times of ease and progress, a strong style difference may show itself as a very positive benefit.  In times of change or stress the same difference may feel like a boulder in the meeting that everyone is constantly needing to climb over.

Moving forward  A training or facilitation using a behavioral assessment such as the DISC® Work of Leaders, to integrate behavioral leadership styles information into the understanding of the organization’s direction, vision, etc., can work simply and directly to lessen and frustration or conflict in team conversations.  If the team has already had a training in this topic, it may be time to review past learning and re-integrate the information looking at current organizational challenges and opportunities. A bit of added awareness can go a long way in realigning your team and adding forward motion.

This is part 2 of a 5-part series. Click here Part 1 to read from the beginning.  If you don’t already follow my blog, sign up now (in the right-hand column) to receive email notifications of future posts. I appreciate your readership and welcome your thoughts and comments!

5 Tips in 5 Parts – Transforming Leadership Disagreements into Leadership Alignment – Part 1

~ what to do when your leadership team clashes more than it agrees ~ 


This 5-p
art February series is about aligned leadership. If you are the leader of an organization, the manager of a team, or part of a team that can spend too much time struggling to find agreement, I’m confident you will find at least two take-aways for helping your team stay aligned and attain their highest-level success. This is Part 1 of the series.

Are continuous leadership disagreements stalling your company’s success? When “varied perspectives” become continually disagreeing perspectives, the success of your organization or company can suffer the consequences. Delayed decisions, meetings that take too much time, and discussions that focus more on problems than solutions, are sometimes only the top layer of what’s not working.

There are numerous possible recurrent issues, such as a major conflict regarding the organization itself to an increase in a team member’s personal stress-level. When team conflicts consistently arise, your ability to get a clear sense of the cause or problem is a first step in addressing it.

Part 1

An unresolved issue between two (or more) individuals  Conflict areas may include difficulties such as: competition over a promotion, resource allocation, competing organizational strategies or needs. Negative emotions that linger are often easily recharged by certain topics or discussion and close off an individual’s ability to participate in team discussions openly and objectively. The sooner these challenges are addressed and resolved, the sooner your team can be aligned and positively engaged in their mission and plan.

Moving forward  Have a frank one-on-one conversation with the involved team members. As leader, you can help address the difficulty head-on. Direct conversations with focus on understanding and support may get to the bottom of the struggle and help individuals resolve past difficulties and focus on current goals. If difficulties continue, consider bringing in the outside support of a coach to help facilitate a direct and lasting solution.

This is part 1 of a 5-part series.  If you don’t already follow my blog, sign up now (in the right-hand column) to  receive email notifications of future posts. I appreciate your readership and welcome your thoughts and comments!

 

 

What Women Leaders Offer Businesses

Thank you to @BostonGlobe @BostonGlobeMag for last week’s Globe Magazine issue, “Women & Power.”  The articles, interviews and personal quotes provide a behind-the-work perspective of these women leaders and the wisdom and advice that inspired them along their way.  Hearing from women executives about what they have learned and how they address the challenges of managing a family and personal life while thriving in their careers, offers inspiration and also very real advice.

In a larger context, the article reminds us that the world is not only ready for more women leaders, the time is ripe for torch bearers leading the way to different, more expanded version of what it means to lead.

This expanded concept of leadership addresses more human needs, such as the need for:

  • greater emotional intelligence and self-awareness,
  • appreciation and respect,
  • inspiration and support of individual growth and work engagement,
  • support of a work environment and schedule needs in ways that build trust, foster loyalty, and spark innovation.

 

From “Women & Power” 

What advice has had the biggest impact on your success over the years? From Maryrose Sylvester, President and CEO, Current, Powered by GE…

VISION   “A number of years ago, a GE leader told me to “find the open door.”  Our business was going through a very challenging time, and his point was that I needed to change my lens and start viewing the struggle as an opportunity….  There’s always an open door; a leader’s job is to find it and guide others through it.”

What words or mission statement do you live by in the workplace?  From Maureen Franco, CEO of Cambridge BioMarketing…

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE   “My mantra is all about people — success comes down to who you work for, who you work with, and who you hire.  I have never regretted spending extra time to vet a candidate, mentor a rising star, or even closely evaluate the people who were hiring me.  It is crucial that those you work alongside challenge you to think more creatively and strategically.”

 

How does having more women in positions of power benefit a company?  From Mindy Berman, Managing Director, Investor Group Services…

OPENNESS   “It ensures that a company benefits from diversity of thought and perspective, which research shows results in better decision making.  Women make up a large percentage of the workforce, so having women in power ensures that the leadership can best represent female employees, clients, and customers.”

 

 

Trish Pratt,  Certified Executive and Career Development Coach — Greater Boston area

Leadership, Coaching and Mindset

Does your Leadership Development program address mindset?

Leadership Development programs often address strategic aspects of communication, planning and other organizational challenges.  Though the learning can be helpful and confidence-building, a true expansion of leadership must address an individual’s underlying navigation system – the patterns that propel them, guide their thinking, and frame their perspectives and decisions.  To affect the quality of leadership, a Leadership Development program must consider an individual’s mindset.

“Why Leadership-Development Programs Fail” , an article from McKinsey & Company, @McKinsey, written by Gurdjian, Halbeisen, and Lane does a great job of outlining the key aspects of leadership-development that are often overlooked – “mindset” being one of them.

Organized Leadership – 8 Keys Steps to Increasing Your Efficiency

??????????????????????????????

Great article from @Inc., “Eight Things Really Efficient People Do”  Although you may know someone who seems naturally gifted in the area of organization and efficiency, both of these skills are learned and developed.  The great tips in this article make the whole process for being more efficient … more efficient!