What Women Leaders Offer Businesses

Thank you to @BostonGlobe @BostonGlobeMag for last week’s Globe Magazine issue, “Women & Power.”  The articles, interviews and personal quotes provide a behind-the-work perspective of these women leaders and the wisdom and advice that inspired them along their way.  Hearing from women executives about what they have learned and how they address the challenges of managing a family and personal life while thriving in their careers, offers inspiration and also very real advice.

In a larger context, the article reminds us that the world is not only ready for more women leaders, the time is ripe for torch bearers leading the way to different, more expanded version of what it means to lead.

This expanded concept of leadership addresses more human needs, such as the need for:

  • greater emotional intelligence and self-awareness,
  • appreciation and respect,
  • inspiration and support of individual growth and work engagement,
  • support of a work environment and schedule needs in ways that build trust, foster loyalty, and spark innovation.

 

From “Women & Power” 

What advice has had the biggest impact on your success over the years? From Maryrose Sylvester, President and CEO, Current, Powered by GE…

VISION   “A number of years ago, a GE leader told me to “find the open door.”  Our business was going through a very challenging time, and his point was that I needed to change my lens and start viewing the struggle as an opportunity….  There’s always an open door; a leader’s job is to find it and guide others through it.”

What words or mission statement do you live by in the workplace?  From Maureen Franco, CEO of Cambridge BioMarketing…

EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE   “My mantra is all about people — success comes down to who you work for, who you work with, and who you hire.  I have never regretted spending extra time to vet a candidate, mentor a rising star, or even closely evaluate the people who were hiring me.  It is crucial that those you work alongside challenge you to think more creatively and strategically.”

 

How does having more women in positions of power benefit a company?  From Mindy Berman, Managing Director, Investor Group Services…

OPENNESS   “It ensures that a company benefits from diversity of thought and perspective, which research shows results in better decision making.  Women make up a large percentage of the workforce, so having women in power ensures that the leadership can best represent female employees, clients, and customers.”

 

 

Trish Pratt,  Certified Executive and Career Development Coach — Greater Boston area

The Power of DISC and Your Career Success: Part 4 of a 5-part series

Career Coach DISC C Executive

Moving on to the fourth dimension of the DiSC, let’s look at the “C”.

Conscientiousness, Quality, Details and Standards – these are hallmark strengths of a high “C” dimension. Where the “I” and “S” dimensions include the ability to sense or “see” the big picture of a situation. “C” qualities are about discerning and details.

Having a co-worker or staff member with a strong “C” dimension, means working with someone who will notice the standards and mind the details. If you’re an individual with high “C” traits, you look to manage your work and career from lower risk strategies and prefer environments that reflect high-quality results.  As with the first three dimensions we discussed, the “C” dimension also has its strengths and challenges.

Some Coaching challenges for the high “C” dimension are:

  • Need for higher standards – frustration with management’s or team’s lack of work/project standards and quality, and/or lack of planning.
  • Unstable environment – frustration with organization’s changing goals, lack of focus or plan.
  • Lack of time – to accomplish quality work; feeling pressured to accomplish too much in too short of time.
  • Communication difficulties – regarding above, or complaints from others who feel criticized or micro-managed.
  • Frustrating feedback — Complaints from management or team regarding productivity and/or slow decision-making.
  • Work/Life balance challenges – too much work, too little support, struggles with delegating.

If you relate to any of these challenges, notice how your “C” strengths support your work, and yet also go out of balance from time to time. The “C” dimension brings a set of great leadership qualities that are often seen in financial executives, accountants, engineers, attorneys, and others. Consider a DiSC assessment to help you leverage your “C” and expand your career leadership potential!

If your organization is ready to streamline their team effectiveness, contact Trish for more information on how a team DiSC Workshop can expand communication and elevate your team success!

Work/Life Balance — Where Companies Win

Do you find yourself working hard to excel in your work accomplishments, only to find yourself wondering what has happened to your life?  i.e., your family time, your exercise plan, or your simple need to eat right and relax?

Navigating the balance and success of business, family, health and enjoyment can be confusing and itself a stressful goal.

“Why You Hate Work” a great article from Tony Schwartz and Christine Porath, speaks directly to companies about the benefits they receive when their employees get what they need from their work.

Don’t settle for a life of stressful, work trade-offs.  Consider working with a coach to clarify your priorities and enjoy the success of balance!

 

 

Trish Pratt,  Executive and Career Development Coach — Greater Boston area.

Getting Real About Work/Life Balance

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As the world shifts, we shift. You may be thinking differently about what you need from your work, your business or career. After all, if your work isn’t supporting the life that you want, you may be asking yourself, “Why am I working this hard?”  It’s less and less about the stomach crunches, fancy car or big house. It’s more and more about feeling good.

In this wonderful TED 2011 video http://tinyurl.com/4qektsr, Nigel Marsh turns the subject of work/life balance on its ears.  He very candidly shares his thoughts about his ideal day, and then thoughts to consider in finding your “middle ground” place of balance.

Seems to me it always comes back to what we’ve always known.   It’s the simple things that matter.